Perlin Noise in C#

I had some Delphi code banging around that I’ve used many times, it was originally written by Tom Nuydens (tom@delphi3d.net). I decided to translate it to C#, you’ll find it below and some code where I’m using it.

using System;

namespace ImageTools.Core
{

    /* Perlin noise class.  ( by Tom Nuydens (tom@delphi3d.net) )
 * Converted to C# by Mattias Fagerlund, Mattias.Fagerlund@cortego.se

  ******************************************************************************

  I used the following references for my implementation:

http://students.vassar.edu/mazucker/code/perlin-noise-math-faq.html

    Darwin Peachey's chapter in "Texturing & Modeling: A Procedural Approach"
  Another good resource is

http://freespace.virgin.net/hugo.elias/models/m_perlin.htm

  ******************************************************************************

  This class generates 3D Perlin noise. The demo that comes with this is 2D, but
  uses the 3rd dimension to create animated noise. The noise does not tile,
  although it could be made to do so with a few small modifications to the
  algorithm.

  Perlin noise can be used as a starting point for all kinds of things,
  including terrain generation, cloud rendering, procedural textures, and more.
  Most of these techniques involve rendering multiple "octaves" of noise. This
  means you generate multiple noise values for every pixel (each with different
  X, Y and/or Z coordinates), and then sum them. There's an example of this in
  the accompanying demo.
*/

    public class PerlinNoise
    {
        private const int GradientSizeTable = 256;
        private readonly Random _random;
        private readonly double[] _gradients = new double[GradientSizeTable * 3];
        /* Borrowed from Darwyn Peachey (see references above).
           The gradient table is indexed with an XYZ triplet, which is first turned
           into a single random index using a lookup in this table. The table simply
           contains all numbers in [0..255] in random order. */
        private readonly byte[] _perm = new byte[] {
              225,155,210,108,175,199,221,144,203,116, 70,213, 69,158, 33,252,
                5, 82,173,133,222,139,174, 27,  9, 71, 90,246, 75,130, 91,191,
              169,138,  2,151,194,235, 81,  7, 25,113,228,159,205,253,134,142,
              248, 65,224,217, 22,121,229, 63, 89,103, 96,104,156, 17,201,129,
               36,  8,165,110,237,117,231, 56,132,211,152, 20,181,111,239,218,
              170,163, 51,172,157, 47, 80,212,176,250, 87, 49, 99,242,136,189,
              162,115, 44, 43,124, 94,150, 16,141,247, 32, 10,198,223,255, 72,
               53,131, 84, 57,220,197, 58, 50,208, 11,241, 28,  3,192, 62,202,
               18,215,153, 24, 76, 41, 15,179, 39, 46, 55,  6,128,167, 23,188,
              106, 34,187,140,164, 73,112,182,244,195,227, 13, 35, 77,196,185,
               26,200,226,119, 31,123,168,125,249, 68,183,230,177,135,160,180,
               12,  1,243,148,102,166, 38,238,251, 37,240,126, 64, 74,161, 40,
              184,149,171,178,101, 66, 29, 59,146, 61,254,107, 42, 86,154,  4,
              236,232,120, 21,233,209, 45, 98,193,114, 78, 19,206, 14,118,127,
               48, 79,147, 85, 30,207,219, 54, 88,234,190,122, 95, 67,143,109,
              137,214,145, 93, 92,100,245,  0,216,186, 60, 83,105, 97,204, 52};

        public PerlinNoise(int seed)
        {
            _random = new Random(seed);
            InitGradients();
        }

        public double Noise(double x, double y, double z)
        {
            /* The main noise function. Looks up the pseudorandom gradients at the nearest
               lattice points, dots them with the input vector, and interpolates the
               results to produce a single output value in [0, 1] range. */

            int ix = (int)Math.Floor(x);
            double fx0 = x - ix;
            double fx1 = fx0 - 1;
            double wx = Smooth(fx0);

            int iy = (int)Math.Floor(y);
            double fy0 = y - iy;
            double fy1 = fy0 - 1;
            double wy = Smooth(fy0);

            int iz = (int)Math.Floor(z);
            double fz0 = z - iz;
            double fz1 = fz0 - 1;
            double wz = Smooth(fz0);

            double vx0 = Lattice(ix, iy, iz, fx0, fy0, fz0);
            double vx1 = Lattice(ix + 1, iy, iz, fx1, fy0, fz0);
            double vy0 = Lerp(wx, vx0, vx1);

            vx0 = Lattice(ix, iy + 1, iz, fx0, fy1, fz0);
            vx1 = Lattice(ix + 1, iy + 1, iz, fx1, fy1, fz0);
            double vy1 = Lerp(wx, vx0, vx1);

            double vz0 = Lerp(wy, vy0, vy1);

            vx0 = Lattice(ix, iy, iz + 1, fx0, fy0, fz1);
            vx1 = Lattice(ix + 1, iy, iz + 1, fx1, fy0, fz1);
            vy0 = Lerp(wx, vx0, vx1);

            vx0 = Lattice(ix, iy + 1, iz + 1, fx0, fy1, fz1);
            vx1 = Lattice(ix + 1, iy + 1, iz + 1, fx1, fy1, fz1);
            vy1 = Lerp(wx, vx0, vx1);

            double vz1 = Lerp(wy, vy0, vy1);
            return Lerp(wz, vz0, vz1);
        }

        private void InitGradients()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < GradientSizeTable; i++)
            {
                double z = 1f - 2f * _random.NextDouble();
                double r = Math.Sqrt(1f - z * z);
                double theta = 2 * Math.PI * _random.NextDouble();
                _gradients[i * 3] = r * Math.Cos(theta);
                _gradients[i * 3 + 1] = r * Math.Sin(theta);
                _gradients[i * 3 + 2] = z;
            }
        }

        private int Permutate(int x)
        {
            const int mask = GradientSizeTable - 1;
            return _perm[x & mask];
        }

        private int Index(int ix, int iy, int iz)
        {
            // Turn an XYZ triplet into a single gradient table index.
            return Permutate(ix + Permutate(iy + Permutate(iz)));
        }

        private double Lattice(int ix, int iy, int iz, double fx, double fy, double fz)
        {
            // Look up a random gradient at [ix,iy,iz] and dot it with the [fx,fy,fz] vector.
            int index = Index(ix, iy, iz);
            int g = index*3;
            return _gradients[g] * fx + _gradients[g + 1] * fy + _gradients[g + 2] * fz;
        }

        private double Lerp(double t, double value0, double value1)
        {
            // Simple linear interpolation.
            return value0 + t * (value1 - value0);
        }

        private double Smooth(double x)
        {
            /* Smoothing curve. This is used to calculate interpolants so that the noise
              doesn't look blocky when the frequency is low. */
            return x * x * (3 - 2 * x);
        }
    }
}

And here’s an example of how to use it with three octaves of noise. See my previous post about using lambda to manipulate images, that code is required to make this work;

        private void noiseButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            PerlinNoise perlinNoise = new PerlinNoise(99);
            Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(pictureBox.Width, pictureBox.Height);
            double widthDivisor = 1 / (double)pictureBox.Width;
            double heightDivisor = 1 / (double)pictureBox.Height;
            bitmap.SetEachPixelColour(
                (point, color) =>
                {
                    // Note that the result from the noise function is in the range -1 to 1, but I want it in the range of 0 to 1
                    // that's the reason of the strange code
                    double v =
                        // First octave
                        (perlinNoise.Noise(2 * point.X * widthDivisor, 2 * point.Y * heightDivisor, -0.5) + 1) / 2 * 0.7 +
                        // Second octave
                        (perlinNoise.Noise(4 * point.X * widthDivisor, 4 * point.Y * heightDivisor, 0) + 1) / 2 * 0.2 +
                        // Third octave
                        (perlinNoise.Noise(8 * point.X * widthDivisor, 8 * point.Y * heightDivisor, +0.5) + 1) / 2 * 0.1;

                    v = Math.Min(1, Math.Max(0, v));
                    byte b = (byte)(v * 255);
                    return Color.FromArgb(b, b, b);
                });
            pictureBox.Image = bitmap;
        }
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About mfagerlund
Writes code in my sleep - and sometimes it even compiles!

6 Responses to Perlin Noise in C#

  1. Pingback: Generating realistic and playable terrain height-maps « float4×4

  2. Pingback: 2010 in review « Mattias Fagerlund's Coding Blog

  3. Darestium says:

    How do you change the frequency and amplitude in this code example, there is no clear definition when you are creating the noise or the perlin object?

    • mfagerlund says:

      The amplitude is in the range -1 to +1, so to select a different amplitude, you simply multiply the amplitude with whatever amplitude you wish.

      To change the frequency, you simply multiply the t with the frequency you require;

      f = Amplitude * Noise(x * Frequency)

      • HellGate says:

        for some reasons i just get an amplitude between around -0.6 to 0.6. thats very strange and annoying (i use the float version from float4x4)

  4. Pingback: Simplex Noise in C# | Mattias Fagerlund's Coding Blog

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